Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter and Roasted Walnuts (No Pasta Maker Needed!)

Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter and Roasted Walnuts

 

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Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter and Roasted Walnuts has Fall written all over it. It’s mushroom season, comforting pasta and nutty brown butter and walnuts. Even sage brings Fall to the table since it’s often used in Thanksgiving turkey stuffings. Hello comfort food!

 

Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter and Roasted Walnuts

 

I went on a mushroom hunt with my mother, in a damp forest, wearing rain pants and waterproof boots. I could literally roll in the moss without getting wet. I kind of did it, when I tried photographing tiny mushrooms of some sort. We were looking for chanterelles and boletus. Boletus was a totally new thing for us, as we think picking other mushrooms than chanterelles pretty high risk. After assessing the risk and finding out that it’s actually just one mushroom the boletus can look like, and that’s not even poisonous (just not good). And yes – we found both chanterelles and boletus!

 

Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter and Roasted Walnuts

Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter and Roasted Walnuts

 

What do we make of boletus? I immediately thought about comforting pasta – ravioli – and warming, Fall flavors such as brown butter and sage. A little research made me certain that that’s exactly what a lot of other people make with wild mushrooms such as boletus too. I don’t care, I still want to make my own. I’m clearly on the right track, as many other thinks the same.

 

You can really use whatever mushroom you feel like, but chanterelles and boletus are excellent choices! If you can only find regular champignons, I’m sure that will be good too. Let me know if you try it!

 

Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter and Roasted Walnuts

 

Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter and Roasted Walnuts

You Don’t Need a Pasta Maker

 

Wild Mushroom Ravioli can be made without a pasta maker. And I’ll show you how, all you need is a food processor, a rolling pin and 4 hours of resting time. I had never made pasta myself, but I still wanted to use my wild mushrooms in a ravioli, so I did some research. The recipe I followed is from Cook’s Illustrated, and I have done none alterations (other than rewrite it). Although I did not add more flour or water because I found the dough to be perfect (this will probably depend on the size of eggs you use, mine were fairly large).

 

Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter and Roasted Walnuts

Tips to keep in mind when not using a pasta maker:

 

  • Olive oil – makes it easier to roll out by hand
  • Extra yolks – more chew to the dough once cooked (because of the protein), but still easy to roll out
  • Long rest (four hours) – the gluten will relax and it makes it easier to roll out

 

Mix all the ingredients and process in a food processor for 45 seconds, until it’s barely tacky to the touch. Use the chopping knife blade of your food processor and not a flat beater or wire whip. Add more flour or olive oil/water if you need to change the consistency.

 

On a dry surface – knead the dough until smooth (2 min), make a cylinder and wrap in foil and rest in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours. This makes the gluten relax and that in return makes it easier to roll out. I ended up at the mountain, hiking, so I wasn’t home until maybe 6 or 7 hours of resting. And it was a piece of cake to roll out. (In hindsight – are cakes easy to roll out?)

 

Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter and Roasted Walnuts

 

When you are rolling out the dough; cover the dough you are not working with. I cut it in half to make it a little smaller to roll out. Press the dough into a 7 cm (3 in) square with your fingers. Roll with a rolling pin, 15 cm (6 in) square. Dust just a tiny amount of flour on both sides of the dough, and roll it into 1 to 1.5 mm thick (0.04-0.06 in). Start to cut the pasta into 8 cm (3+ in) circles. I used a 8 cm cookie cutter, you can also use a glass or something, but preferably something with a little sharp edges.

 

Super Easy Wild Mushroom Ravioli Filling

 

The Wild Mushroom Ravioli Filling is pretty easy to make. If you don’t want to make it vegetarian, I suggest adding a little bacon in it. It gives more flavor and savory saltyness to it, and it was super delicious. Cook the pieces of bacon until brown but not crispy. After the mushrooms have been brushed clean of any dirt and cut into small bite sized pieces, add them into a non stick saucepan. Cook the mushrooms in the pan with a little butter for 7 minutes. Add in the finely chopped shallot onion and cook until translucent.

 

Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter and Roasted Walnuts

 

Now add in fresh thyme (or dried if you wish), salt and pepper, sherry and heavy cream. If you don’t have sherry, using the same amount of white wine works good too. I used Manzanilla sherry, which is pretty similar to white wine. Give it a boil and simmer until it thickens. We don’t want a very liquid mixture, as this is going into a ravioli.

 

The saucyness comes in the brown butter, which you will make now!

 

Even Easier Sage Brown Butter

 

Helloo brown butter. Fall and brown butter are best friends. Brown butter gives the butter a whole new level of awesome nuttyness, and if you haven’t made brown butter before, now surely is your chance.

 

Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter and Roasted Walnuts

 

Cut your butter into smaller sized pieces so the butter melts evenly. This ensures the browning to happen at the same time in all of the butter. Add it in the pan (with a light bottom so you can see the browning action happening), and melt on medium high heat. The butter will begin to bubble, this is normal. Add in chopped sage. Stir occasionally to check the browning level. Once the butter smells really nutty and it has a lot of brown bits in it, you can take it off the heat. It is these brown bits that tastes nutty, so don’t leave them out when you are pouring it over your wild mushroom ravioli.

 

Assembling and cooking the ravioli

 

Add one small tablespoon of the thickened ravioli filling in the center of each pasta disc. Fold the dough around the filling and press the edges tightly together. Do this with the rest of the filling and pasta discs.

 

Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter and Roasted Walnuts

 

Cook the raviolis in a large saucepan with salted water. Cook them for around 2-4 minutes. Once the raviolis float on the surface, they are done. Pour the ravioli into a colander and drain the pasta water.

 

While the raviolis are cooking, dry roast coarsley chopped walnuts. Just pour them into a dry non stick pan and roast on medium high heat until you can smell the nutty deliciousness.

 

Divide the wild mushroom ravioli among 4 plates (or 8 as an appetizer). Pour the sage brown butter over, drizzle with walnuts and garnish with fresh thyme!

 

Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter and Roasted Walnuts

Other ways to impress your guests:

 

 

Sorry (not sorry) for the long blog post – but now you can wow all your guests or family members with homemade pasta! It’s not as hard as people think, and it’s totally worth the effort. Let me know what you think below, or tag me @thegingerwithspice on Instagram. And don’t forget to pin it for later!

 


 

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Print Recipe
Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter and Roasted Walnuts (No Pasta Maker Needed!) Yum
It's savory mushroom, comforting pasta and nutty brown butter and walnuts. Even sage brings Fall to the table since it's often used in Thanksgiving turkey stuffings. Hello comfort food!
Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter and Roasted Walnuts
Cuisine European, Italian
Keyword herb, mushroom, pasta
Prep Time 45 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Passive Time 4 hours
Servings
people (or 8 as appetizer)
Ingredients
Pasta Dough
Wild Mushroom Ravioli Filling
Sage Brown Butter + Toppings
Cuisine European, Italian
Keyword herb, mushroom, pasta
Prep Time 45 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Passive Time 4 hours
Servings
people (or 8 as appetizer)
Ingredients
Pasta Dough
Wild Mushroom Ravioli Filling
Sage Brown Butter + Toppings
Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter and Roasted Walnuts
Instructions
Pasta Dough
  1. Mix all the ingredients and process in a food processor for 45 seconds, until it's barely tacky to the touch. Use the chopping knife blade of your food processor and not a flat beater or wire whip. Add more flour or olive oil/water if you need to change the consistency.
  2. On a dry surface - knead the dough until smooth (2 min), make a cylinder and wrap in foil and rest in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours. This makes the gluten relax and that in return makes it easier to roll out.
  3. When you are rolling out the dough; cover the dough you are not working with. I cut it in half to make it a little smaller to roll out. Press the dough into a 7 cm (3 in) square with your fingers. Roll with a rolling pin, 15 cm (6 in) square. Dust just a tiny amount of flour on both sides of the dough, and roll it into 1 to 1.5 mm thick (0.04-0.06 in). Start to cut the pasta into 8 cm (3+ in) circles. I used a 8 cm cookie cutter, you can also use a glass or something, but preferably something with a little sharp edges.
Wild Mushroom Ravioli Filling
  1. If you don't want to make it vegetarian, I suggest adding a little bacon in it. It gives more flavor and savory saltyness to it, and it was super delicious. Cook the pieces of bacon until brown but not crispy.
  2. After the mushroom has been brushed clean of any dirt and cut into small bite sized pieces, add them into a non stick saucepan. Cook the mushroom in the pan with a little butter for 7 minutes. Add in the finely chopped shallot onion and cook until translucent.
  3. Now add in fresh thyme (or dried if you wish), salt and pepper, sherry* and heavy cream. Give it a boil and simmer until it thickens. We don't want a very liquid mixture, as this is going into a ravioli.
Sage Brown Butter
  1. Cut your butter into smaller sized pieces so the butter melts evenly. This ensures the browning to happen at the same time in all of the butter. Add it in the pan (with a light bottom so you can see the browning action happening), and melt on medium high heat. The butter will begin to bubble, this is normal.
  2. Add in chopped sage. Stir occasionally to check the browning level. Once the butter smells really nutty and it has a lot of brown bits in it, you can take it off the heat. It is these brown bits that tastes nutty, so don't leave them out when you are pouring it over your wild mushroom ravioli.
Cooking the Ravioli
  1. Add one small tablespoon of the thickened ravioli filling in the center of each pasta disc. Fold the dough around the filling and press the edges tightly together. Do this with the rest of the filling and pasta discs.
  2. Cook the raviolis in a large saucepan with salted water. Cook them for around 2-4 minutes. Once the raviolis floats on the surface, they are done. Pour the ravioli into a colander and drain the pasta water.
  3. While the raviolis are cooking, dry roast coarsley chopped walnuts. Just pour them into a dry non stick pan and roast on medium high heat until you can smell the nutty deliciousness.
  4. Divide the wild mushroom ravioli among 4 plates (or 8 as an appetizer). Pour the sage brown butter over, drizzle with walnuts and garnish with fresh thyme!
Recipe Notes

* If you don't have sherry, using the same amount of white wine works good too. I used Manzanilla sherry, which is pretty similar to white wine.

Did you make it? Tag @thegingerwithspice on Instagram, I'd love to see!
Author: Stine Mari from Ginger with Spice

Pasta recipe adapted from: Cook's Illustrated

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